Category Archives: Hauraki Gulf people

Rangitoto baches are little gems

Some of the earliest baches in the Hauraki Gulf were constructed on the lava-strewn shores of Rangitoto Island. The island was purchased from Ngāti Paoa in 1854 primarily as a source of stone for the construction of Auckland. In 1890 the island was declared a recreational reserve. The Rangitoto Island Domain Board took over administration of the island and pursued a policy of opening up the island for pubic enjoyment. This involved the construction of a wharf on the southern side (Rangitoto Wharf) and the development of a track to the summit.

Rangitoto wharf waharoa
The first Rangitoto wharf was opened in 1897. Shown here is the new wharf which was opened in 2014 with the waharoa (customary gateway) welcoming visitors.

In 1911 the Domain Board started to lease out sites for campers in order to raise funds to cover the costs of administering the island. Eventually baches were built on the sites, with over 140 baches being built at 3 locations; adjacent to the Rangitoto Wharf, in Islington Bay and in McKenzie Bay near the Rangitoto Light. Vibrant holiday communities developed around the baches with families spending the entire summer school holidays there.

Isobel Conning (nee Simmons) remembers wonderful times at her family bach in Islington Bay before World War Two. “At night the bay would be full of yachts and launches. They were so numerous that you could almost walk across the bay on boats. Then someone, on one of the boats, would start up with a mouth organ. Someone else, in another boat, would follow. The crews would start singing and then people on the shore would join in.”

Simmons bach Rangitoto
Simmons bach in Islington Bay Rangitoto Island.

“One Islington Bay bach owner, Jock Loch, was noted for his unusual fishing methods. Wanting to fish from the comfort of his verandah he rigged up a line around a couple of pulleys, with one end attached to the outside of his house, and the other anchored in the sea. After baiting up his hooks, he would wind them down into the tide, tying a bell onto the rope, so that he would be alerted if there was a bite. He would then wind the line back up to his house, with the fish attached.”

By the 1920s there was disquiet about the impact of the baches on the island’s unique ecology. By 1937 a policy of gradually removing the baches had been adopted with owners being given 20 years to vacate and remove the structures. In 1957, when the 20 year time period had expired,  there was a reprieve when the remaining bach owners were granted a new lease for 33 years or the lifetime of the current owner. As the owners gradually reached the end of their lives, the baches started disappearing from the landscape.

Islington Bay bach and remaining infrastructure
At one time there were around 140 baches on Rangitoto Island. Now only some 34 baches remain. The empty infrastructure of vacant building sites and boat ramps can be seen around the coastline as shown here in Islington Bay.

Currently some 34 baches remain on Rangitoto Island. Rather than being seen as a blot on the landscape their historical and cultural value has now been recognised. But their future is still uncertain.

 

Recreational Fishing Park for the Gulf a good idea?

Read a Dialogue piece in today’s NZ Herald by Sue, Rod and Zoe Neureuter, the family who acts as guardians of the Noises Islands. Sue Neureuter’s personal Story of the Gulf features in The Story of the Hauraki Gulf.

“Creating a fishing park in a region in such alarming decline brings division where the opposite is required write Sue, Rod and Zoe Neureuter.”

Sue Neureuter on her boat at the Noises Islands
Sue Neureuter on her boat at the Noises Islands.

Longline Fishing in the Gulf

Longlining was introduced into the Hauraki Gulf as a method of commercial fishing in 1912. It replaced the use of single baited hooks and immediately increased catches. Longling involves setting a main line, with numerous branches lines or snoods connected to it, each containing a baited hook. Each line can hold thousands of hooks. The method was quickly adopted and is still widely used in the Hauraki Gulf. It is a labour intensive, hands-on commercial fishing method, which is targeted and can produce very high quality fish.

Longline gear
Longlining involves the use of one main line (as shown on the drum here) to which hundreds of small branch lines with hooks are attached.
longline baiting the hooks
Hooks are pre-baited and stored on boards prior to being hooked onto the longline as it runs out from the boat.

In the early 1980s a lucrative market for fresh ‘iki jime’ snapper opened up in Japan. This involved spiking the fish in the brain after capture to kill it instantly, and then putting the fish into an ice slurry to rapidly cool its temperature. This resulted in a high quality fish which fetched premium prices. Longline fishermen in the Gulf rapidly adopted the new methods, initially pioneered by Leigh Fisheries.

Longline bringing in the line
Longlining involves retrieving each fish individually. This means that a higher quality of fish can be harvested in comparison to bulk methods such as trawling and Danish seining.
Longline spiking the fish
Longline snapper are spiked in the brain immediately after capture to retain quality. Shown here is a fishermen about to use a spike on a snapper.
longline snapper in slurry
Once released from the line, the snapper are placed into an ice slurry which quickly reduces their temperature also helping to retain quality.

The fish are transported back to port on the same day, sent to the factory for packing and then quickly flown out to high value markets around the world including Australia, the USA and Europe.

Longline vessel unloading a catch at Leigh
Leigh Harbour is still a popular port for longline fishing boats. Shown here is a vessel unloading its catch into a truck for transport to the Leigh Fisheries factory in Leigh.

“Thanks to Dave Moore from Wildfish and the skipper and crew of Coral V for taking me out on a great long lining trip. I was very impressed by how hard you guys worked.”

Seachange Tai Timu Tai Pari

The Seachange Tai Timu Tai Pari initiative is in the process of preparing a marine spatial plan for the Hauraki Gulf. The plan is being developed by a Stakeholder Working Group which has been tasked with developing ‘a spatial plan that will achieve a Hauraki Gulf that is vibrant with life and healthy mauri, is increasingly productive and supports healthy and prosperous communities.’

Fixing the Gulf, Boating NZ, 27 July 2016

Listen to author and SWG member Raewyn Peart talk about Seachange

Nature’ article identifies marine spatial planning as a way of bringing fishers and conservationists together to address ecosystem issues.

The Group is focused on identifying ways, to turn around the degradation that has happened over the last century or so, within the next generation. It is committed to achieving this through adopting a holistic approach to solutions based on mātauranga Māori as well as western science.

Seachange Haruaki Plains wide
Participants in Seachange Tai Timu Tai Pari have gone out into the field to investigate the drivers of ecological decline in the Hauraki Gulf. Shown here is a trip to the Hauraki Plains to look at the drainage infrastructure.

The Seachange process is being sponsored by the Auckland Council, Waikato Regional Council, Department of Conservation and Ministry for Primary Industries. It is expected that these organisations will implement the marine spatial plan.

Seachange members visiting the Whangapoua forest
Seachange participants visited the Whangapoua Forest on the Coromandel Peninsula to look at management approaches to reducing sediment runoff as a result of forestry harvesting and earthworks.

The plan is scheduled to be completed later in 2016. The Story of the Hauraki Gulf has been written to help support the implementation of the spatial plan through communicating the issues to a broader audience.